Colombian Free Trade Agreement

The agreement was then subject to judicial review required by the Constitution, in accordance with Colombian regulations. The agreement was found to be in conformity with the Colombian Constitution by the Colombian Constitutional Court in July 2008. [9] The Investment Chapter (Chapter 5) aims to improve the legal framework for EFTA and Colombian companies investing in the markets of the other, in particular by granting non-discriminatory rights of establishment and exploitation (industrial presence) in sectors not covered by the Chapter on Trade in Services. On November 18, 2003, the USTR informed the U.S. Congress of its intention to enter into free trade negotiations with Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru, all beneficiaries of the Andean Anti-Trade Act (ATPA). Negotiations are expected to begin in the second quarter of 2004 in order to start with Colombia and Peru. Environmental protection commitments: Both parties also committed to effectively implement their own national environmental laws and to adopt, maintain and implement laws, regulations and all other measures in order to meet their obligations under covered multilateral environmental agreements. All obligations under the environmental chapter are subject to the same dispute settlement procedures and enforcement mechanisms as the AAA`s trade obligations. On October 12, 2011, the United States Congress authorized Colombia-United States. Free Trade Agreement.

On October 21, 2011, the President of the United States signed legislation implementing the agreement. On April 10, 2012, the Colombian Congress approved the implementing legislation of the TPA between the United States and Colombia. On 15 The trade agreement between the United States and Colombia entered into force on 1 May 2012. In the first 10 months of the Santos government in Colombia, 104 labour and human rights activists were murdered. One category of human rights violations involves the assassination of more than 50 leaders of the legal left by paramilitaries and death squads, and sometimes accusations of multinational involvement have been laid. In some cases, this has resulted in damaging public accusations and even lawsuits for several U.S. and Canadian multinationals (including Dole, Coca-Cola, Drummond Coal, and Chiquita, formerly known as the United Fruit Company). The Colombian mining union Sintraminercol claimed that many international mining companies already working in Colombia have a record of paramilitary cooperation and environmental neglect. . . .